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1. The Commisary at Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

2. Grazing Cows at El Canopy, San Cristóbal, in 2016

3. The Government House on Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

4. Hacienda El Progreso Dance Hall

5. Hacienda El Progreso, with Deputy, Manuel A. Cobos and Accountant, 1919

6. Bakelite Cinco Centavo Tokens Issued by Hacienda El Progreso

7. The Landscape Surrounding Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

8. The Dock and Decauville Rail in Puerto Chico, 1919

9. Portrait of Jose Monroy in 1878

10. Triple Effect Vacuum Evaporator, Hacienda El Progreso

11. Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, Hacienda El Progreso in 2012

12. Hacienda El Progreso, with Deputy, Manuel A. Cobos and Accountant, 1919

13. Worker's Quarters, Hacienda El Progreso, 1919

14. Datura Grove Near La Cárcel, El Progreso, San Cristóbal, 2016

15. Bakelite Cinco Centavo Token Issued by Hacienda El Progreso

16. Invasive Vegetation, Road to La Soledad, San Cristóbal, in 2014

17. A Family of Village Residents in Hacienda El Progreso

18. Lighthouse-keeper's Residence, Puerto Chico 1919

19. Manuel J. Cobos in Field Dress

20. Thomas Lewis, Puerto Chico 1919

21. La Cárcel under Invasive Vegetation, El Progreso, San Cristóbal, 2014

22. Vulcanite (left) and lead (right) tokens Issued by Hacienda El Progreso

23. The Hacienda Pier in Puerto Chico

24. The Hacienda Prisoners on the dock in 1905

25. The four lifeboats were tied together in pairs, and the work of unloading the 14 prefabricated houses could begin.

26. View of the Worker's Houses, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

27. Hacienda House, View from La Cárcel, in 2014

28. Two of the original Campo Noruega houses were later reassembled as one large house.

29. Close-up of Women at Mess-hall, Hacienda El Progreso, 1888

30. La Cárcel, View from the Hacienda House, in 2014

31. Hacienda El Progreso, with Deputy, Manuel A. Cobos and Accountant, 1919

32. It was about 10 kilometers (6 miles) inland from the coast up to the plateau where Campo Noruego was to be established. To begin with, they used the tractor to transport equipment, but soon found out that it was cheaper and quicker to hire local men with teams of oxen to do the job instead. The carts were brought along from Norway.

33. Port Official and Soldiers on Chatham Island in 1905

34. Hacienda El Progreso, with Deputy, Manuel A. Cobos and Accountant, 1919

35. Exotic Fruits on Display at Campo Noruego 1927

36. Manuel J. Cobos' Tomb

37. Close-up of the Workers and Spilt-cane House, Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

38. Hacienda El Progreso, with Deputy, Manuel A. Cobos and Accountant, 1919

39. Portrait of Sr. Leonardo Reina

40. Exterior Stairway to Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, Hacienda El Progreso in 2014

41. The "Manuel J. Cobos" Re-Christened as the "San Cristóbal"

42. Communal Mess-hall, and Worker's Houses, Hacienda El Progreso

43. View of the Worker's Houses, Hacienda El Progreso in 1933/34

44. Cerro San Joaquin seen from Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, in 2014

45. Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, Hacienda El Progreso in 2014

46. El Progreso School Field Trip to El Junco, in 2016

47. Portrait of Manuel J. Cobos in 1878

48. View of the Worker's Houses, Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

49. Project Meeting with Town Elders, El Progreso, 2017

50. Interior View of Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, in 2018

51. The village of Progreso is 300 meters above sea-level on Isla San Cristóbal. In the mid-1920s it had about 300 inhabitants.

52. Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

53. Manuel J. Cobos' Hacienda House, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

54. The schooner Manuel J. Cobos named after Progreso's founder, moored along the jetty in Wreck Bay.

55. The store in Progreso belonged to Alvarado and Cobos. Practically all workers on the island received their wages from the same gentlemen.

56. One Sucre Monetary Note Issued by Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

57. View of the Worker's Houses, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

58. Manuel A. Cobos welcomes the Albemarle expedition to Galápagos. He strongly urges them to make San Cristóbal their terminal station.

59. El Rondel Traffic Circle Entrance to El Progreso, in 2012

60. Monetary Note and Coins Issued by Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

61. When Albemarle sailed back to Panamá, Harry Randall moved in with Manuel A. Cobos. Nearly every day he went riding with his host.

62. The Wreck Bay pier in 1938

63. Rogerio Alvarado was married to Josefina, Manuel A. Cobos' older sister. He lived most of the time in Guayaquil.

64. View of Worker's House, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

65. Paul Bruun was captain of the Manuel J. Cobos for about 18 months before he started trading with the Norge. The island community was dependent on the old schooner to obtain provisions from the continent. Delays and fuel shortages proved fatal for Bruun, her former skipper. When this photo was taken in 1934, the schooner had been re-named San Cristóbal.

66. Manuel J. Cobos poses with Workers, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

67. When Jens Aschehoug and Per Bang visited Galápagos in 1922, the steam-powered sugar factory was in full operation, but decay had set in.

68. Manuel A. Cobos (4th from left) invites the Floreana party for sight-seeing at the sugar factory. Cobos wears a broad-rimmed hat, riding breeches and a revolver holster across his chest.

69. Manuel J. Cobos poses with Workers, Hacienda El Progreso in 1888

70. Hacienda El Progreso's Bodega at Puerto Chico in 1905

71. The local matazarno tree was excellent for house construction, but trunks of this size are not to be found in Galápagos. Photo is probably of a mainland tree.

72. Local Student Tour Group, El Progreso, 2014

73. Gálapagos Academic Institute of Arts and Sciences and Gálapagos Science Center, Playa Mann, in 2012

74. Map of Land Use in the Zone of Special Use (ZUE) in San Cristóbal Island

75. The Handling of the Hacienda Prisoners in 1905

76. The view looking towards Wreck Bay shows the rails leading to the pier, and what was for a long time the archipelago's only lighthouse. “Johnson from London” lived in the shack next to the light.

77. Left: Manuel A. Cobos and Dagfinn on horseback, Progresso. Right: Karin, Tony, Dagfinn and Manuel Cobos. The photograph was taken in 1933 and was sent to friends Ruth and Alf Ødegård who, at that time, were back in Norway. The picture does not reveal anything about the great finanical crash which had already ruined both Manuel and his brother-in-law, Rogerio Alvarado.

78. WWII Cannon on Cañón Beach, Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, 2016

79. Hacienda El Progreso, Main Street in 1905

80. Sea Lions on Playa Mann and Cruise Ships in Wreck Bay, 2012

81. Carpintero Midden Profile

82. Accounting Office and Armchair inside the Hacienda House

83. Bacalao, coffee, sugar, yucca flour, corn and cattle were the most important export products on San Cristóbal. Here, the Manuel J. Cobos is loaded with sacks from the trolleys on the long pier at Wreck Bay.

84. The Government House on Hacienda El Progreso in 1905

85. Locally Harvested Invasive Cedar at the El Progreso Carpentry, 2016

86. Map of Zone of Special Use (ZUE) in San Cristóbal Island

87. Great class distinction, racial prejudice, language problems and religious barriers made communication between Norwegians and local residents difficult in San Cristóbal. Upon their arrival in Galápagos, the Norwegian colonists were quite unprepared for these problems.

88. Beer Shipment Loaded onto Trucks, Commercial Dock, Wreck Bay

89. Digital Terrain Model of the Central Mill Area Using LiDAR Returns

90. The Cemetery at Puerto Chico in 1905

91. Karin and Manuel Cobos with two-year old Dagfinn, Wreck Bay, 1932.

92. The romantic Karin revealed herself also as a woman with great willpower. In 1945 she was overwhelmed with marital problems, obligations as a mother of six, and financial difficulties. She and Manuel separated. With the help of the children and their father, she established her own cattle ranch. In 1952 she moved into the first “Pampa Mia” near Progreso.

93. Gravel Quarry, Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, in 2012

94. The Hacienda Sugar Mill in 1905

95. 1983 was an extremely wet El Niño year, and two years later Galápagos experienced one of the worst droughts in memory. But Snefrid (82) and Karin (77) on “Pampa Mia” hold their own for they know that the pendulum will soon swing back to normal.

96. Digital Terrain Model of the Central Mill with Cross Section Panels Using LiDAR Returns

97. Feral Goats above Hacienda La Tranquila, La Soledad, San Cristóbal, in 2014