Glimpses into Chinese Immigration in Canada The New Republic & The World Journal Vancouver Newspapers

中醫面臨取締危機 尋求華人聲援


Abstract:
Medicine, Chinese ; Acupuncture ; College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Subjects:
Medicine, Chinese ; Acupuncture ; College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Subjects Facet:
Medicine, Chinese;Acupuncture;College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Creator:
阮炳忠 ; Ruan, Bingzhong
Date:
1992-05-12
Date searchable:
1992-05-12
Date searchable:
1992-05-12
Genre:
articles
Genre Facet:
articles
Format:
image/tiff
Language:
Chinese
Language Facet:
Chinese
Relation:
Article from: World Journal(世界日報)
Rights:
Contact UVic Archives for access to the original resource and for reproduction requests (fee for reproductions).This material is made available on this site for research and private study only.
Title-Alternative:
Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine Face a Crisis of Being Banned
Description-Abstract:
Keywords: Zhang, Jinda ; Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Association of Canada
Location(s):
Ontario
Location(s) Facet:
Ontario
Transcript:
中醫面臨取締危機 尋求華人聲援 西醫公會入稟安省法院 要求禁制名稱 張金達稱中醫藥在加拿大有消失可能 【本報記者阮炳忠多倫多報導】加拿大中醫針灸學會會長張金達昨(十一)日表示,中醫藥及針灸師現正面臨被取締的危機邊緣。為了保持華人的尊嚴,希望每個華裔人士都對該會加以聲援。 他說,安省由外科醫師公會較早前入稟安省法院,要求禁止他使用「醫生」,及「中醫藥針灸醫生」的名稱,聆訊排在六月三日舉行。 張金達說,他對西醫公會此一舉措十分不解。因為中醫師及針灸師是中國傳統的醫師,也是中國文化的一部分,幾千年前中國人便管叫這些醫師為「大夫」,也便是醫生。 他說,他絕對相信,在加拿大的華人不會因為他們使用「醫生」或「中醫藥針灸醫生」的名稱,而誤會他們是西醫。他在安省倫敦市行醫二十多年,不少病人是西人,這些西人也從來不會因為他使用「醫生」的名銜而誤會他是西醫。 他指出,西醫公會採取這項行動,唯一可能的便是種族歧視的行為,有計畫地取締中醫藥及針灸師。因為很明顯是,一旦西醫公會六月三日在安省法庭獲得勝訴的話,進一步的行動便是禁止中醫針灸師繼續行醫,使中醫藥在加拿大消失於無形。 張金達說,該學會已聘請了代表律師, 將在法庭據理力爭。此外,他也希望華人社區加以聲援。 他說,經過連日的奔走,現在在多倫多已爭取到二十一個華人社團的支持,在安省倫敦市也有十五個非華人社團作其後盾,這些社團均贊成他們繼續沿用「醫生」及「中醫針灸醫生」的名銜。並支持他們向安省衛生部申請管制中醫師及針灸師,最終給予合法地位。 加拿大中醫針灸學會副會長岑寓齋表示,他對這次官司感到很棘手,假如敗訴的話,今後多倫多中醫師及針灸師的情況,便一如滿地可,所有的中醫藥針灸師均需經過考試,獲得執照後, 本人仍不能執業,一定要依附在西醫診所,由西醫指示才能進行針灸診療。這等於是變相取締中醫及針灸醫生。他說,該學會前些時曾與西醫公會就此事進行商談,表示願意放棄「Dr. 」的寫法,而改用「C. M. D.」中醫師,及「D. R. AC」針灸醫師的名號,但西醫公會仍入稟法院。 他說,其實「Dr.」一詞,不單是西醫專用,博士、及一些神職人員都可使用。 English translation: Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine Face a Crisis of Being Banned Seeking Support from Chinese Canadians CPSO Filed an Application in Ontario Asking to Ban the Title Zhang Jinda Said that Chinese Medicine Might Disappear in Canada Reporter Ruan Bingzhong reports from Toronto Zhang Jinda, president of the Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Association of Canada (CMAAC), said yesterday (the 11th) that Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists are now facing the edge of a crisis of being banned. In order to preserve the dignity of Chinese Canadians, [he] hopes that every Chinese Canadian will give their support to the association. He said that the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO)[?] had earlier filed an application through the Ontario Court of Justice to prohibit him from using the titles of "doctor" and "traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturist". The hearing was scheduled on June 3rd. Zhang Jinda said that he is very confused by the actions of the CPSO. Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists are traditional Chinese doctors and part of Chinese culture. Chinese people called these doctors "dai fu" thousands of years ago, which means doctor. He said that he absolutely believes that Chinese in Canada will not misunderstand them as doctors of Western medicine because they use the names of "doctors" or "traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturists". He has been practicing medicine in London, Ontario for more than 20 years. Many patients are Westerners, and they have never misunderstood him as a doctor of Western Medicine because he used the title of “doctor”. He pointed out that the only possible reason that the CPSO took this action was because of racial discrimination. It plans to ban traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. Because it is obvious that when the CPSO won the case in the court on June 3rd, their next action is to prohibit Chinese medicine acupuncturists from continuing to practice medicine, so that Chinese medicine disappears and becomes invisible in Canada. Zhang Jinda said that CMAAC has hired a lawyer and that they will make strong arguments in court. He also hopes that the Chinese community will support him. He said that after several days of trying, he has now earned the support of 21 Chinese associations in Toronto and 15 non-Chinese associations in London, Ontario. These associations are all in favour of the continued usage of the titles of “doctor” and “traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturist”. They also support the application to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in Ontario for control of Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists, and ultimately to give them legal status. Cen Yuzhai, vice president of the CMAAC, said that this lawsuit is difficult to handle. If they lose the case, the situation of traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists in Toronto will be the same as Montreal. All traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturists must pass an examination. After obtaining their license, they still cannot practice on their own. They must attach to a Western medicine clinic and can only conduct acupuncture treatment according to the instructions of doctors of Western medicine. This is tantamount to banning traditional Chinese medicine practitioners and acupuncturists, just in a disguised form. He said that the CMAAC had discussed this matter with the CPSO some time ago and expressed its willingness to abandon the “Dr.” title and change it to the title of “C.M.D.”, Chinese medicine doctor, and “D.R. AC”, acupuncture doctor, but the CPSO still filed an application through the court. He said that in fact, the term “Dr.” is not only used for doctors of Western medicine but also for people with a doctorate degree and some clergy.